Bar Dykes

Bar Dykes
Merril Mushroom, Faythe Levine, and Caroline Paquita
Pegacorn Press, September 2016
8.5″ X 6 7/8″, 32 pages, saddle stitched
Five color Risograph printed (teal, florescent pink, raisin, federal blue, gold)
First edition printing of 300
Debuted at the New York Art Book Fair

In the 1980s, Merril Mushroom wrote Bar Dykes, a one act play about 1950s dyke bar culture. In 2016, editors Faythe Levine and Caroline Paquita, collaborated with Merril to properly publish the play, accompanied by related ephemera, and a current interview with her concerning her unique and radical life as a “back to the land,” womonwriter.


Encounters, by Dean Sameshima

ENCOUNTERS
Dean Sameshima
Pegacorn Press, September 2016
5 3/8″ X 8.5″, 28 pages, saddle stitched
Two color Risograph printed (gold + federal blue)
First edition printing of 250
Debuted at the New York Art Book Fair

ENCOUNTERS is a collection of photographs taken by Dean Sameshima between 1993-2001 throughout Los Angeles, California, at varying “tearooms”. Tearooms are public spaces, mainly public restrooms, where men meet for anonymous sex. Sameshima began a documentary photography series titled WONDERLAND in 1993 while an undergrad at CalArts. At this time he felt an urgency to start documenting public sex spaces in Los Angeles as a way of recording an important part of his history and Los Angeles gay history. These tearoom drawings were especially interesting to him because they were the most temporary form of communication and many were painted over/erased by his subsequent visits. While working on this project, many of the tearooms were being policed, raided and eventually shut down.


Lost Love//Love Lost

Lost Love//Love Lost
Caroline Paquita
Pegacorn Press, August 2016
5″ X 8″, 16 pages, saddle stiched
Risograph printed multiple colors
First edition printing of 100
Printed in Toronto, in collaboration with Colour Code
Debuted at Zine Dream in Toronto, Ontario

Lost Love//Love Lost is an experimental prose + photo book by Caroline Paquita, written about Evan Sabourin, a friend who passed away this year. The beginning in a series about loss of loved ones—friends, parents, lovers, acquaintances—this first book is an homage to him and a means to process grief through art making.


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RANCHERO
Mike Taylor
Pegacorn Press, May 2016
7 1/4″ X 5 3/8″, 12 pages, saddle stitched
Three color Risograph printed (cover: florescent pink, and flat gold, interior: teal)
Edition of 150

A comic mini, RANCHERO, is the story of two teenage girls and freedom and the law.


LGLG cover

LET GO, LET GAIA
Caroline Paquita
Brooklyn, NY, September 2015
6.5″ X 4.25″, 16 pages, French Fold, saddle stitched, with gaff tape binding.
Risograph printed with teal, fluorescent pink, gold, and black ink.
Debuted at the New York Art Book Fair in September 2015
Edition of 100

Let Go, Let Gaia is a small publication made by Caroline Paquita, that is a visual exploration into technology and how it affects our “energy.” With text from such books as “Be Here Now” and “Psychic Protection,” the publication ruminates on different ways that certain day to day technologies that we use (phone + computer), deplete our energy, and how people have been concerned about this for some time now.


late era clash #27 cover

Late Era Clash #27
Mike Taylor
Brooklyn, NY, September 2015
8.5″ X 6.75″, 24 pages, saddle stitched
Risograph printed with teal, florescent pink, and black ink.
Debuted at the New York Art Book Fair
Edition of 300

Late Era Clash #27 began as a real-time studio visit with Mike Taylor, its creator. Throughout July and August, he wrote and drew a detailed description of his process and motivation for zine making. However, with the unexpected death of a friend, the text takes a turn inward in the last few pages, altering the entire tone of the work as a whole, becoming a meditation on why any of us make art in the first place. Funny and heartbreaking in turns.


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Untitled
Cold Meat
Brooklyn, NY, September 2015
8.5″ X ~5.5″, 40 pages, saddle stitched.
Risograph printed with black, gold, and burgundy ink.
Debuted at the New York Art Book Fair
Two editions of 250

From the introduction: These works were compiled to highlight some of the best examples of BDSM fetish art, from the collection of Cold Meat, a print connoisseur based in San Francisco, California. Ranging roughly from 1900-1970, a majority of these images were originally published in underground fetish digests, flagellation novels, chapbooks, and illicit magazines of the time.


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Lesbian Lexicon
Editor: Stevie Anntonym
Brooklyn, NY, June 2015
Edition of 1,000
4.25” X 6.5”, 40 pages, saddle stitched.
Risograph printed with fluorescent pink, teal, and gold ink. Covers vary between orchid and tan colored paper-stock.

The Lesbian Lexicon documents words invented to describe previously unnamed queer phenomenon, words already used in popular queer vernacular, and a few gay words of antiquity. This third edition has been revamped with many new hilarious additions from contributors all over the U.S.


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Primordial Cooch
Caroline Paquita
Brooklyn, NY, January 2015
28 pages + cover, 3.75″ X 6″, saddle stitched with rounded corners.
Risograph printed using florescent pink, blue and gold ink.
First edition of 150, second edition of 200. (First edition comes with a titled band around the publication—second edition does not.
This book debuted at the LA Art Book Fair in January 2015.

A visual exploration and homage to women, PRIMORDIAL COOCH combines imagery of ancient sculptures, vintage photography, text, and Paquita’s drawings. Vaginal references and lewd humor are the backbone to this compact publication.


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The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen by Mike Taylor
Mike Taylor
Brooklyn, NY, January 2015
8.5″ X 5.5″, 20 pages, saddle stitched.
Risograph printed with brown and blue ink on white stock.
Hand-numbered edition of 150.
Debuted at the LA Art Book Fair in January 2015.

Mike Taylor: “An analysis of a reader’s position within the text and context of a, some say, generation defining novel. Not mean spirited at all, promise.”